Nothing can change the shape of things to come.

The New York Times has made a rather astute, yet obvious observation about Texans and their relationship to their home state.  Specifically, Texans like the shape of Texas and feel that the look of the state itself is iconic. Anyone with two eyes who gazes at the unique appearance of our borders can discern that, but to the paper of record this must be a remarkable state of affairs.

Most state shapes are boring. Look at states like Colorado, Kansas, Iowa, Mississippi, Alabama,  I could go on ... all square or rectangular. Texas, as usual, is different. Not simply because it's a massive landmass - Texas draws its boundaries along natural lines: the Rio Grande, the Sabine Pass, the Gulf of Mexico...God made these particular borders, not men.

The most interesting states are the ones with unique shapes. California. Florida. Of course my home state of Louisiana, the boot-shaped next door neighbor. Texas and Louisiana have a bond for many reasons. Texans take pride in their size, while Louisiana-ans take pride in their culture and diversity.  This is not to say the Texas isn't diverse. Indeed, a state this large is bound to have many different kinds of people.  But that only proves my point: in Texas there's enough room for everybody, and room enough to move.  Wide-open spaces, as an old country hit extolled.

I will say this: I've never seen a Louisiana shaped waffle iron. Then again, waffles aren't really the go-to breakfast pastry there.  Recently, the Abita Brewery unveiled a new beer called The Boot, named after the shape of Louisiana which will only be for sale there.  Interesting idea, but hardly original: Lone Star Beer has been the "national beer' in Texas for decades. Congrats on catching up, Abita.

Lone Star Beer (File Photo)

And there you have the real thing that drives Texas pride: the former republic of Texas. Everyone remembers the tourism campaign, "Texas: it's like a whole other country." Once upon a time - for a very short period of time - it was.  Often, you'll hear some saber rattling by Uber partisans about leaving the union. There are some asinine ideas in the world, few more so than that one.  Thankfully, the majority of Texans roll their eyes at such claptrap. In the end, being the most unique state in a large group of individual states is what makes us attractive to residents and businesses alike.

I have three times the pride: proud to be an American, proud to be from Louisiana and as proud as I could be to be living in Texas. Thank you Jesus for blessing me.